College – U. Got It?

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If you are a tennis fan, then you’re probably in your glory this time of year. From the French Open to Wimbledon to the U.S. Open, summer is packed with fierce tennis competition.

Although school is out for college tennis players, there are probably numerous student athletes out there with their eyes glue to the matches on TV, wondering if and when it will ever be them in one of the Grand Slam tournaments.

Tennis talent can pop up anywhere, of course, but it helps if you go to a school known for its court competitors. Many colleges and universities have tennis teams, whether they compete or play on the intramural level. Here are the top 10 schools for men’s and women’s tennis in the NCAA Divisions I and II. Are you heading off to one of them in the fall?

Men’s Division I
University of Southern California
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
University of Virginia
University of Texas at Austin
Ohio State University
UCLA
Baylor University
University of Florida
Stanford
Texas A & M

Women’s Division I
Stanford
University of Florida
University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill
Baylor University
Notre Dame
UCLA
Northwestern
University of Michigan
Duke University
University of Miami

Like Division I, Division II schools award athletic scholarships, but the schools are often smaller and they don’t have the some of the restrictions that Division I schools have. Check out this list—some of these schools might be new to you.

Men’s Division II
Valdosta State University
Armstrong Atlantic University
Oachita Baptist University
Barry University
Lynn University
Hawaii Pacific University
Rollins College
Florida Southern University
University of West Florida
Columbus State University

Women’s Division II
Armstrong Atlantic State University
Barry University
Brigham Young University-Hawaii
Lynn University
Valdosta State University
California University of Pennsylvania
Rollins College
University of West Florida
Hawaii Pacific University
Clayton State University

Like many of the top golf schools, most of these top tennis colleges and universities are located in warm weather states. After all, clay and grass are much better surfaces to play tennis on than ice and snow—but wouldn’t THAT make an awesome new event at the Winter Olympics?

–Barbara Bellesi

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